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What a Domain Is ~ Why You Need One

A domain is simply a personalized name for an internet address. 

It's not the same thing as a website. 

You could have 10 domain names all pull up/point to the same website. 

For more on this distinction, see this FAQ
Domain vs. Website

A famous example of a domain is Google.com.


A DOMAIN is like a phone number.
A WEBSITE is like your house.
A DOMAIN REGISTRAR is like the phone company.
DNS is like the phone company's exchange settings.

Here's the analogy:
You can point your PHONE NUMBER to your HOUSE by having the PHONE COMPANY change the EXCHANGE settings for YOUR PHONE NUMBER.
or
You can point your DOMAIN to your WEBSITE by having your DOMAIN REGISTRAR change the DNS settings for your DOMAIN.


You'll probably want your FASO website to be at YourName.com instead of having our business name in your website address, like this: YourUsername.faso.com

1 domain is included in all our current plans.

When you register your own domain, it then redirects a browser to the actual address of your site. The main benefit is convenience and having an individual identity that associates your name with your site. It's also good for your SEO (Search Engine Optimization) plus showing who your links belong to.

Once you register a domain it is yours - you own it - even if you move your website to another host. (This is one time you can take it with you.)

To register your own personal domain name, see this FAQ:
How do I register a Domain Name?

It is recommended but certainly not required.

A few FASO clients simply use the subdomain / system address, username.faso.com, that FASO assigns to each account when the account is opened.

Domains are not cAse-sEnsiTive. It can help your fans to more easily read your domain name if you use capitalization when printing your domain on a business card for example.


Also see this document:
Domains - A nuts and bolts lesson Part 1

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